Why go: Inside the cozy, pop-art-inspired quarters, you’ll find themed sandwiches made to order with local ingredients. Create your very own with an array of toppings and spreads to choose from or opt for one of the iconic sandwiches that Pom Pom’s is known for. We’re partial to the spicy Elvis, filled with banana, bacon, strawberry jelly and cayenne peanut butter.
Seito has been at the forefront of Orlando’s slowly evolving sushi scene for the last few years, rolling out an inventive menu that using traditional Japanese techniques to create new and bold takes on the classics. Emphasis is also placed on using the freshest ingredients possible – as Japanese cuisine dictates – with fish imported in daily. But Seito is no one trick pony; good news if you’re a not a fan of raw fish. Much of the menu is also made up of other Japanese staples, such as ramen, tempura, and curries. Do note that Seito Sushi now has two branches, one close to Downtown on New Broad Street at Baldwin Park and the other out of town at Sand Lake. Read More...
Despite my lack of the requisite hours, Bauer agrees to let me sit for the three-hour exam, held in a hotel ballroom in Pittsburgh during the society’s annual conference. I arrive along with 50 other candidates and am shown to my table, which has a clipboard of evaluation sheets for a dozen categories of cheese — from soft-ripened to cheddars to blue mold to goat cheese to washed rind — as well as cups of aroma samples, unidentified liquids marked A to J that I will have to sniff and identify blind. The proctor tells us there are to be no photos, and no posting or sharing on social media. “Though there’s not much in your phone that can help you now,” he says. Along the back wall of the ballroom are a team of cheesemongers cutting samples, where we will go to get our cheeses to evaluate.
The Ritz-Carlton’s signature restaurant is a predictably elegant affair, and has been billed as one of the very best hotel restaurants in the world by various acclaimed publications and food critics. Chef Norman Van Aken's fuses Latin, Caribbean and Asian flavors together to create a vibrant and healthy menu that is described as ‘New World Cuisine’. Still sounds vague? Examples for the mains section – which changes seasonally – includes a pan fried fillet of Yellowtail Snapper, Mongolian marinated BBQ-style veal with Thai friend rice and Japanese eggplant, and pork ‘Havana’, served with black bean sweet corn salsa. Most of Norman’s appetizers are in the $10-20 range, and mains $30-60, which doesn’t make this the most expensive fine diner in the city, but certainly not the cheapest. Read More...
We're in the thick of winter, and soups aren't going anywhere. There's only one thing that goes better with soup than crusty bread, and that's the Instant Pot, which shaves off hours of prep time without sacrificing any of the flavor. No matter your base ingredient—beef, squash, beans, pork, you name it—your favorite reliable appliance will turn out fantastic soups and stews every. single. time. 
Promising a refined Italian menu of thin crust pizzas, delectable pastas and an excellent Trattoria-style wine program, the Hilton’s signature La Luce is up there amongst Orlando’s best restaurants. Only open for dinner, the candlelit tables and lulling music makes for a romantic setting, although the generously-sized potions and lively service make this good for the whole family. If you’re not into your wines, the creative Mediterranean-inspired cocktail list is well worth checking out too.
When I visit Armenteros at the shop in Princeton, he guides me into the humidor, amid shelves of boxes and hundreds of cigars. “The most fulfilling, exciting thing we do,” he says, “is when you take a customer to another level. When you open up their enjoyment. That’s the greatest thing a tobacconist, or any sommelier, can do.” He talks excitedly about the differences among Nicaraguan, Dominican and Cuban tobacco, wrappers grown in Connecticut or Ecuador, the size or “ring gauge,” from skinny lancero to coronas to robustos to thick Churchills. A Padrón cigar, from Nicaragua, “is a steak, a wagyu.” Meanwhile, another cigar from the Dominican Republic “is like fish. It’s an elegant, delicate cigar.” We compare what spirits to pair with cigars, and both of us agree that describing flavors is not easy. “Not just in cigars,” he says, “but in any world of organoleptic delicacies.” He points to some cigars he’s been aging for close to a decade. I ask if cigars can age like wine. “F— yeah,” he says.
×