This fun, American restaurant is owned and operated by two graduates of The Culinary Institute of America. The Stubborn Mule offers unique dining that’s perfect dinners. Also, their cocktail menu is something you should definitely consider. They offer delicious cocktails, craft beers, wines, and more to pair with you meal. This is also one of the best places to brunch.
The name of this Thornton Park/South Eola restaurant makes vague reference to the unusual collection of dishes it offers, not so much the oddball patronage it sometimes draws. Owners Brian Buttner and Jonathan Canonaco, who operate the well-received Stubborn Mule across the street, took over the old NoLa-inspired Muddy Waters space and transformed it into a trendy, see-and-be-seen sort of joint. Smoked duck wings, caramel-lacquered Asian pork spears and vegan pate don’t exactly scream “eclectic” but, hey, what trendoids want, trendoids get.
The short drive out of town to this gem of a restaurant is well worth it; in fact, it’s not only a restaurant, but more of a café in the day and bar at night with live music – although the menu of comfort food classics like club sandwiches, pulled pork burgers, tacos and wraps is served throughout the day. The quaint house near Lake Toho promises different areas too, meaning you can slide up to the lively bar for a crafty craft ale, find an intimate corner spot if you’re on a date or find a seat in the charming courtyard to soak up the summery vibes.
Lalousis had been managing Maille’s retail boutique in London when he was tapped for his expertise. “My boss told me, ‘I think you’ve got a calling. You’ve got a love for mustard.’ ” He was sent to the factory in Dijon for six months of training and learned “everything there was to know about mustard.” As far as Lalousis is aware, he’s the only mustard sommelier in the world. That’s not to say, however, that he is the first mustard sommelier in history. “We had a mustard sommelier in 1747 when we opened a store in Paris,” he says. At that time in Paris, Dijon mustard was not well known. “Our founder wanted people to know how to use Dijon mustard. He wanted to show people that it was an ingredient and not just a condiment.” And if Lalousis has his way, he will not be the last. He’s developing an educational program that will certify future mustard sommeliers about types of mustard seed, harvest techniques, chemical compounds in mustard, regional differences, levels and qualities of pungency, various pairings and uses, and what Lalousis calls “the culture of mustard.”
When you’re losing steam after a long day out with your family and need a snack and a drink to hold you over until dinner, head to Cocina 214 in Winter Park for Happy Hour. This Tex-Mex spot serves 12 types of margaritas and lots of things that are perfect for a small pre-meal, like tacos, queso fundido, and fried avocado bites. And if you don’t feel like relocating to another spot after a few drinks, the burritos and tamales should help hold you over until breakfast.
After dinner – and occasionally, when you just want to escape and indulge, too – it’s time for dessertsand sweets. We’ve anticipated your need for delightfully rich and indulgent treats and put together a collection of desserts to help you serve up something lovely each and every day. From birthday cakes fit for a queen – or king – to boxed chocolates that make excellent stocking stuffers, we have everything you need to inspire and impress foodie friends and loved ones.
I love chicken parmesan… SO much.  But I definitely don’t love the tedious breading process, so many dishes to wash, and how long it can take to make it!  I dreamt up this dish a while ago, then found out The Cookie Rookie had already made a great version… so I headed over to her page and made some tweaks based on what I had on hand.  This version is made with everyday ingredients, and is incredibly flavorful!
Since I just spent a year writing a book about cider, the first credential I seek out is to become a Certified Cider Professional (or CCP), a brand-new professional title created by the United States Association of Cider Makers. I attended an introductory seminar on the CCP Level 1 exam at CiderCon in Baltimore in the winter of 2018. The following summer, one afternoon on a whim — without any further study — I decide to log in to the cider association website, pay $75 and take the exam. There are 60 questions on apple history, apple classifications and genetics, cidermaking techniques, styles of cider, detecting flaws, and food pairings with cider. I submit my answers, then find out instantaneously that I’ve gotten 89 percent correct — a passing grade. It has taken me 37 minutes 47 seconds to complete the exam, which includes the interruption of a 15-minute work call. I am now proudly a Level 1 Certified Cider Professional — a cider sommelier. I receive a felt CCP patch in the mail — one that I might have proudly ironed onto my acid-washed jean jacket back in the ’80s. Within months, I am teaching cider classes to candidates who also hope to pass the CCP Level 1 test.
Why go: Domu serves authentic Japanese style ramen right alongside their very own spins on the classics. Attached to the East End Market—Orlando’s European-style artisan hall of makers—the restaurant feels super hip. In terms of specific orders, we suggest always asking for the kimchi butter chicken wings, an appetizer so good, it will make your head spin.
Make a big impression and give one of our gourmet gift baskets to the lucky host, newlyweds, or relatives. Packed with delicious gourmet food, our gift baskets are sure to please. Peruse our selection and pick out the one that fits the occasion best. So the next time you’re in a pinch, or just want to try something new and delicious, shop QVC for gourmet food, drinks, and more.
Who invented "Florida cuisine?" We're not sure if the first person to smoke mullet and smear it on a cracker graduated from culinary school, but we do know that if a name jumps out for having raised the bar (and this is NOT to underplay the importance or deliciousness of basic smoked fish dip on any level), it's surely Norman Van Aken. His skills with the Sunshine State's oceanic bounty are on full display at 1921, where you might find barrelfish or striped bass or some other tender-flaky offering, but those less inclined to opt for the raw bar will find plenty of other options, from a "Koreatown" take on fried chicken and mac to a succulent wagyu ribeye to a juicy burger with house bacon and a zingy horseradish cream.
While Orlando is in the south, it’s not really a Southern city. If you’re looking for some proper Southern food though, you can find it at The Coop in Winter Park. This place specializes in fried chicken, which you should definitely get, but they also serve po’boys, shrimp and grits, and plenty of traditional sides, if a bucket of chicken isn’t what you’re after. They also serve breakfast seven days a week, which includes classics like chicken and waffles and biscuits with gravy. Just make sure to schedule a nap for afterwards if you stop by.
Stock your shelves and storage containers with our spices and seasonings, from classic American rubs to international spices and salts. Infuse every dish with flavor with a little help from our vast variety of condiments and sauces. From gourmet mustards and fine oils and vinegars to zesty barbeque sauces and spicy hot sauces, we have something to spread, dip or drizzle on all of your favorite foods.
Norman Van Aken is a culinary legend and a proud adopted Floridian, which plays nicely into delicious and often Latin-, Caribbean- and even Key West-infused fare. Sit outside and enjoy spectacular views of lakes, gardens and the Ritz-Carlton's expansive, green golf course or dine in climate-controlled majesty – vaulted ceilings and Italianate windows help bring that outside essence in. Tapas like Key West shrimp ceviche or delicate caviar may prime your palate for creamy cracked conch chowder or rhum and pepper painted Florida black grouper. Norman's is, of course, not a one-dollar-sign venue, but for vacationers and those looking for a sumptuous meal out, few venues are as resplendent as the Ritz-Carlton, and few restaurants could match it as well as Norman's.

When I move to the evaluation portion, however, I immediately realize I am in way over my head. Any hubris I had cracks when I pop my first sample, a soft-ripened cheese, into my mouth. I chew. It just tastes like … soft cheese. I am supposed to evaluate this based on 70 characteristics and flaws in four categories (appearance, aroma, texture and flavor). And not just the presence of, say, a nutty or herbal aroma or an animal or grassy flavor, but “much too little,” “too little,” “just about right,” “too much” or “much too much.” At the table in front of me I see another candidate spit into a bucket. Wait a minute! I think. Are we supposed to spit cheese when we taste it, like wine? I spit my soft-ripened cheese into the bucket on my table (which is gross, to be honest). Still, I gamely trudge on for almost three hours. When I get to the evaluation sheet for Emmental-style (i.e., Swiss) cheese, there is a category for “Eye Development,” with characteristics such as blind, underset, irregular and dead/dull eyes. So cheese has eyes? When I approach the cheesemongers for a sample of cheddar, I steal a glance at the clipboard of a bearded guy in a Hawaiian shirt and Birkenstocks standing next to me. He marks “seamy” on one of his score sheets. What does it mean to have a seamy cheese? I am so out of my league, I don’t even know what I don’t know.

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