The Ritz-Carlton’s signature restaurant is a predictably elegant affair, and has been billed as one of the very best hotel restaurants in the world by various acclaimed publications and food critics. Chef Norman Van Aken's fuses Latin, Caribbean and Asian flavors together to create a vibrant and healthy menu that is described as ‘New World Cuisine’. Still sounds vague? Examples for the mains section – which changes seasonally – includes a pan fried fillet of Yellowtail Snapper, Mongolian marinated BBQ-style veal with Thai friend rice and Japanese eggplant, and pork ‘Havana’, served with black bean sweet corn salsa. Most of Norman’s appetizers are in the $10-20 range, and mains $30-60, which doesn’t make this the most expensive fine diner in the city, but certainly not the cheapest. Read More...

This downtown bar looks like a cross between a library in an old mansion and a barn, with antiques and vintage furniture everywhere and bartenders dressed in suspenders. While it’s definitely a unique space, they also make some of the best cocktails in the city. Mathers also has a small food menu, which includes everything from chili rice cakes to charcuterie boards, and a general store for the times when absinthe and candy sound like the right combination to end a night.
The Sanctum really does feel a little sacred in the way they do things; its beautiful plant-based plates are colorful and fresh and alluring. And while there are loads of options for the vegan members of the populace, this place isn't that strict � you'll also find eggs and cheese on the menu in places. Grain bowls and salads, sammies and pasta populate a menu that holistic practitioners would likely tout. Delicious juices and smoothies tempt those looking for goodness by the glass. Breakfast/brunch is exceptional, whether you like your avocado toast animal-free or feel like topping it off with a couple of organic eggs.
Indeed, what the rise of specialized taste education, the cult of sensory analysis, and the wine-ification of everything means is that taste is becoming more and more codified all the time. There are good tastes and bad tastes; not only that, there’s a growing caste of gatekeepers in every field who are keeping score on what tastes great, middling and flawed. Maybe this is what morality or philosophy looks like in an increasingly post-religious, post-intellectual, materialistic United States. We are a people in need of an authority, a higher voice, some guidance — even if it comes from behind the cheese counter. Maybe, for many affluent Americans, the sommeliers of everything represent something shaman-like. Listen to me. I am your one true sommelier. 

Norman Van Aken is a culinary legend and a proud adopted Floridian, which plays nicely into delicious and often Latin-, Caribbean- and even Key West-infused fare. Sit outside and enjoy spectacular views of lakes, gardens and the Ritz-Carlton's expansive, green golf course or dine in climate-controlled majesty – vaulted ceilings and Italianate windows help bring that outside essence in. Tapas like Key West shrimp ceviche or delicate caviar may prime your palate for creamy cracked conch chowder or rhum and pepper painted Florida black grouper. Norman's is, of course, not a one-dollar-sign venue, but for vacationers and those looking for a sumptuous meal out, few venues are as resplendent as the Ritz-Carlton, and few restaurants could match it as well as Norman's.
Mythos Restaurant is an award-winning restaurant built into what appears to be a cave. Located in The Jurassic Park: The Lost Continent® section of Universal’s Islands of Adventure, the interior evokes the prehistoric setting well, although the menu takes a sharp detour from the caveman theme. Greek and pan-Mediterranean dishes are the specialty here, including risotto, mezze platter, and lamb skewers. What we love about this restaurant is that you can have high-level contemporary cuisine with excellent service and all the trimmings without having to leave all the fun of the fair.
Take a cue from the pros and try your hand at sous vide preparations for incredibly tender steaks, cooked to your exact temperature specifications every time. This kit comes with an Anova immersion circulator and sous vide bag, plus two wagyu New York strip steaks, two wagyu ribeye filets, black pepper infused salt, and a prep guide to walk you through making the most delicious steak you've ever had. 
The meaning of the word Gourmet has evolved throughout the centuries. The word Gourmet is derived from an old French term for a servant that works with wine. The French are known for their love of foods, and word Gourmet often is tied to French cuisine particularly in relation to their cheese and wine. By the 1700s, the terms Gourmet and Gourmand were used to simply describe an individual who enjoyed overeating. Luckily, Gourmet lost its derogatory connotation and has been rehabilitated into a positive term, describing a highly desirable type of food.

I am not ready to admit how effortlessly I attained this certification until, one evening, I find myself at Anxo Cidery, the epicenter of Washington’s cider scene, in Northwest D.C. Anxo required all of its front-of-house staff to become CCPs, and I am chatting with two bartenders about how I’ve passed the exam. They both also recently passed. “That exam was so easy,” one bartender tells me. “I took it when I was drunk.”
With an ever-changing selection, you’re sure to find something delicious for even the pickiest eaters in your household. Browse our breakfast foods, such as flaky croissants and sweet morning treats. Wake up to the alluring scent of an easy-to-prepare and easy-to-enjoy gourmet food item. We also offer ready-to-enjoy side dishes that can give a whole new spin to your favorite meal. Peruse food from Cheryl’s, Harry London, Authentic Gourmet, Kansas City Steak Company, and Corky's. You'll find food such as Smithfield hams and delicious faves from other well-known names in premium food, such as Lobster Gram.
Gourmet food refers to food and drink that takes extra care to make or acquire. Gourmet food is often found or made only in certain locations. The ingredients used may be exotic and hard to find in regular grocery stores. They might only be available in limited amounts or rarely exported outside of their place of origin. Some, such as truffles, must be wild harvested and can't be cultivated. They often are unique in flavor or texture.
Marchese tells me that when she detects a metallic taste in the honey, she knows the beekeeper has likely used rusty equipment. When she tastes too much smoky flavor, she knows the honey came from an inexperienced beekeeper who uses too much smoke because he’s afraid of bees. Which is to say Marchese’s palate is so finely tuned that she can literally taste the beekeeper’s fear in a smear of honey.
Certain events such as wine tastings cater to people who consider themselves gourmets and foodies. Television programs (such as those on the Food Network) and publications such as Gourmet magazine often serve gourmets with food columns and features. Gourmet tourism is a niche industry catering to people who travel to food or wine tastings, restaurants, or food and wine production regions for leisure.[18][19]
My training as a honey sommelier at the American Honey Tasting Society culminates with eight wineglasses filled with various honeys, lined up from light to dark. My instructor, Carla Marina Marchese, tells me that when we taste honey, we don’t do the ceremonial swirl — the wine expert’s ritual — before we sniff. Honey sommeliers smear. “Smear it on the sides of the glass like this,” she says, using a tiny plastic spoon. Once the honey is smeared, I can stick my nose in the glass to properly evaluate the aroma, then spoon a dollop onto my tongue.

Eater editors get asked one question more than any other: “Where should I eat right now?” Orlando dining obsessives want to know what’s new, what’s hot, and what favorite chef just launched a new spot. So here they are – the fresh faces on our ever-evolving restaurant scene; the newish spots setting tongues awagging from the theme parks to downtown Orlando to the city’s suburban enclaves and all the neighborhoods in between.


Serving ‘food for the starving artist’, Café Tu Tu Tango is an artsy, colorful little venue with a huge spirit of fun and community. Local artists display their work on the restaurant’s walls and strike up conversation with guests, while local ingredients are turned into delicious, tapas-style concoctions perfect for sharing. Try the Argentinean-style orange chimmichurri steak, the adventurous guava-glazed barbecue pork ribs or the chorizo al fuego – a delicious mix of spicy Spanish chorizo served with brandy-glazed fingerling potatoes. The atmosphere at Café Tu Tu Tango is vibrant and bohemian, so prepare to dive into a world where creativity meets community.
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